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PRIOR GRANT RECIPIENTS

2008 Grant winner
2007 Grant winners
2006 Grant winners
2005 Grant winners


2008 Grant winner

Excerpts from the Application:


PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Gerhard Steenkamp
TITLE OF PROJECT: Dental and maxilofacial treatment of large carnivores (captive and wild) in South Africa and Namibia.

DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT:
This project was initiated by Dr. Gerhard Steenkamp in 1998, when he returned to South Africa. It revolves mainly around 2 centres; the De Wildt Cheetah and Wildlife centre near Pretoria South Africa, and Africat near Otjiwarongo in Namibia. For more information regarding both these projects please visit them at:

De Wildt Cheetah and Wildlife Centre: www.dewildt.co.za
Africat: www.africat.org

The vision of both these organisations are quite diverse, however their principles are the same, and that is to provide the best veterinary care for their animals. This may be for animals kept in captivity or those captured in the wild (on farms where they kill livestock) and then released on farms that will allow these carnivores to roam freely and not be persecuted.

Health checks are done annually on more than 120 cheetahs at these 2 centres and Dr. Steenkamp is part of this health team to evaluate the oral cavities and do treatments as necessary. At both centres there are often student groups (mostly foreign) attending these health visits and we provide these students with training into all aspects of veterinary care for carnivores, especially cheetahs.

From time to time Dr. Steenkamp is also consulted by veterinarians involved in other similar facilities in southern Africa. He has also done substantial work for both Johannesburg Zoo and the National Zoological gardens in the field of veterinary dentistry on a multitude of species.

WHAT IS THE ANTICIPATED MEASURABLE BENEFIT FROM THIS PROJECT?

  1. The main benefit of this project is the individual animals that are treated and for whom their quality of life is improved
  2. To carry on with this project for the foreseeable future giving the benefit of good oral health to these animals
  3. Continued student involvement and training into the particular needs of wild carnivores. This is also done in conjunction with Brothers Safaris (www.brotherssafaris.com), which specialises in operating tours for veterinarians and veterinary students to South Africa.
  4. Analysing and publishing data relating to the oral pathology of large carnivores, especially cheetahs.

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2007 Grant winners

Excerpts from the Applications:


Zoo & Wild Animals

MATTHEW J. RYAN VETERINARY HOSPITAL
UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA


PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Viacheslav Eroshin, DVM
CO-INVESTIGATORS: John R. Lewis, VMD, FAVD, Dipl. AVDC; Alexander M. Reiter, Dipl.Tzt., Dr.med.vet., Dipl. AVDC, EVDC; Jeleen Briscoe, VMD, Dipl. ABVP (Avian); Nicole R. Wyre, DVM; Karen L. Rosenthal, DVM, MS, Dipl. ABVP

TITLE: Treatment of Dental Disease In Rescued Ferrets

DESCRIPTION: The aim of the clinical study is to propose treatment protocol for common oral conditions and to determine prevalence and significance of oral disease in ferrets.

BENEFITS OF THE PROJECT: Although there are numerous studies showing the prevalence of dental disease in dogs, cats, humans and other species with brachyodont dentition, there is a lack of objective information regarding ferret dental health. Veterinary dentists and exotic animal veterinarians who see ferrets in their practice acknowledge that ferrets are afflicted by similar dental problems that affect other species, including periodontal and endodontic disease, but the prevalence of such disease is unknown. It may be justified to assume that the prevalence of dental disease is higher in rescued ferrets than in pet ferrets due to lack of prevention, concurrent disease, and suboptimal diet and housing. Thus, our study will focus on this rescue population.

Equines

WESTERN COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE
UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN


PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS: Dr. James M.G. Anthony
CO-RESEARCHER: Dr. James Carmalt

TITLE: Incidence of Equine Oral Pathology

DESCRIPTION: To evaluate 500-1000 equine heads from a slaughter facility for signs of oral pathology. The pathology would be recorded, photographed, and possibly sent for histological evaluation (if sufficient funds). Ages, sex, and location would be gathered, if available, and tabulated. This would give an incidence of oral pathology in the horse which has never been documented as of yet.

BENEFITS OF THE PROJECT:

  1. To document the incidence of oral pathology in the horse so a base line can be established
  2. To make equine practitioners aware of the degree of oral pathology
  3. To see if age, sex and location is a factor
  4. To document and have histological evaluations of oral pathology in the horse as a reference

Small Animals

MATTHEW J. RYAN VETERINARY HOSPITAL
UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS
: Dr. Colin Harvey, BVSc, FRCVS, DipAVDC (Professor of Surgery and Dentistry, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania), Dr. Lila Miller, DVM (Vice President for Veterinary Outreach, American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, NY, NY)

TITLE: Oral-Dental Disease and Dental Treatment in Dogs and Cats in US Animal Shelters

DESCRIPTION: Animals in many shelters in the USA will be killed if they are not adopted within a short time. Reasons for not being adoptable include behavior problems (which can be caused by dental disease), overt physical disease (periodontal disease is the #1 'disease' diagnosis in small animal practice, resulting in clinically obvious gingivitis and bleeding from the mouth in severe cases) or lacking attractiveness (bad breath could be an important factor in that first few seconds in which a bond does or does not start to form between the adoption-available dog or cat and the potential adopter).

Some oral/dental diseases can be easily identified and often can managed with readily available techniques. If the facilities and expertise to recognize and manage oral/dental disease that would otherwise interfere with likelihood of adoption were available in an animal shelter, additional animals can be brought into adoptable status.

The project proposed here does not meet the usual PEIVDF criteria in that it does not offer treatment of individual disadvantaged animals as part of the scope of the project. What the project is designed to determine is whether there would be value in a second phase (which would require funding beyond the level available currently in PEIVDF grants) in which dental treatment would be provided in a specific animal shelter as a model that could determine the practicalities of offering oral examination and treatment to potentially adoptable dogs and cats for application to all animal shelters.

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2006 Grant winners

Excerpts from the Applications:


Zoo & Wild Animals

INTERNATIONAL ANIMAL RESCUE
BEAR SANCTUARY, AGRA, INDIA

www.iar.org.uk
IAR is registered in the US as a Nonprofit and has 501 C(3) status. IAR is registered in all states.

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS: Alan Knight OBE BSc(hons), Lisa Milella

BACKGROUND INFORMATION: International Animal Rescue is a small, hands-on rescue charity that comes to the aid of animals in distress and seeks to find practical solutions that benefit both animals and people. IAR was registered as a 501(c)(3) in April 2002.

IAR provides hands-on rescue and short or long term rehabilitation for wild and domestic animals. We return rescued animals to their natural environment wherever possible, but also provide sanctuary for animals that are no longer able to survive in the wild.

IAR rescues and rehabilitates endangered sloth bears that have been cruelly abused as dancing bears in India. Sloth bears are protected under Appendix 1 of the Convention in International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), but they are still taken from the wild by poachers. IAR funds three sanctuaries in India which take in and care for the rescued bears. To date 242 bears have been rescued and we estimate there to be 500 dancing bears remaining on the streets. At the same time, we work with the Indian government to provide retraining and new employment for the bears’ handlers.

The bears are snatched from their mothers when they are only a few weeks old and sold to nomads known as ‘kalandars’ who train them to perform for tourists. The cub has his teeth knocked out and his claws removed to make him easier to handle. A red hot poker is pushed up through his nostril and out through the top of his snout. A rope is threaded through the raw wound, enabling the kalandars to control the bear and force him to ‘dance’ on his hind legs. The bear leads a miserable life on the hot dusty roads of India. He may become blind from severe malnutrition as well as suffering bruises and broken bones from regular beatings.

Equines

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
VETERINARY MEDICAL CENTER

PRINCIPAL LEADER AND ORGANIZER: Gary S. Goldstein, DVM, FAVD, Diplomate AVDC (Associate Professor, Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Director of Veterinary Dentistry and Oral Surgery, University of Minnesota Veterinary Medical Center)
PRINCIPAL LECTURERS: David Klugh, DVM, Fellow of the Academy of Equine Dentistry, Portland, OR; Mike Lowder, DVM, Director of Field Services, U of GA; Ian Dacre, BVS, PhD, Royal CVS, New Zealand, Massey University

BACKGROUND: Equine veterinary dentistry is an untapped discipline in equine medicine and the most exciting and fastest growing discipline in companion animal veterinary medicine. By offering advanced equine dental symposia annually, we have an opportunity to improve the quality of equine dentistry practiced, to expand research activities in equine dentistry and to promote the importance of oral care in the equine which is crucial to promoting oral health care of horses around the world. The University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine has presented three extremely successful international equine dental symposia over the past couple of years. Currently, there are no other formal equine veterinary dental training programs at any university veterinary school in the country, however, the number of students, veterinarians and veterinary technicians (the demand) that seek this level of equine veterinary dental continuing education far exceeds the number of training programs (the supply) that currently exist. The key people involved have donated much of their time to this endeavourer, however, to ensure the quality of these intense hands on programs, proper equipment is needed to teach and train the attendees.

Small Animals

BRAZILIAN VETERINARY DENTAL ASSOCIATION (ABOV)
PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Marco A. Gioso, AVDC diplomate,(A.B.O.V.)

RATIONALE: The project of the Brazilian Veterinary Oral Health Campaign is based on the campaign organized by Hills Pet Nutrition and the American Veterinary Dentistry Society (AVDS) in the USA, intents to initiate a public awareness campaign organized by the Brazilian Veterinary Dentistry Association (ABOV) in order to call attention of pet owners to the fact that some health problems can be prevented by putting into practice the concept of oral hygiene in pets. This project consists of coordinated actions of marketing that will take place throughout one month (30 days) of the year 2007.

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2005 Grant winners

Excerpts from the Applications:


Zoo & Wild Animals

DE MEDICINA VETERINARIA
UNIVERSIDADE DE SAO PAULO

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Marco Gioso

JUSTIFICATION: We intend to give to continuity the research with great neotropical felids, however giving to a bigger emphasis in the spreading of the Veterinary Dentistry possible through clarifying manual delivery on oral health and methodologies to be used in zoos to diminish the incidences of verbal injuries and providing basic training of the professionals of zoos in the recognition of the clinical signals of the mórbidos processes.

Equines

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
VETERINARY MEDICAL CENTER

PRINCIPAL LEADER AND ORGANIZER: Gary S. Goldstein, DVM, FAVD, Diplomate AVDC (Associate Professor, Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Director of Veterinary Dentistry and Oral Surgery, University of Minnesota Veterinary Medical Center)
PRINCIPAL LECTURERS: David Klugh, DVM, Fellow of the Academy of Equine Dentistry, Portland, OR; Mike Lowder, DVM, Director of Field Services, U of GA; Ian Dacre, BVS, PhD, Royal CVS, New Zealand, Massey University

BACKGROUND: Equine veterinary dentistry is an untapped discipline in equine medicine and the most exciting and fastest growing discipline in companion animal veterinary medicine. By offering advanced equine dental symposia annually, we have an opportunity to improve the quality of equine dentistry practiced, to expand research activities in equine dentistry and to promote the importance of oral care in the equine which is crucial to promoting oral health care of horses around the world. The University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine has presented three extremely successful international equine dental symposia over the past couple of years. Currently, there are no other formal equine veterinary dental training programs at any university veterinary school in the country, however, the number of students, veterinarians and veterinary technicians (the demand) that seek this level of equine veterinary dental continuing education far exceeds the number of training programs (the supply) that currently exist. The key people involved have donated much of their time to this endeavourer, however, to ensure the quality of these intense hands on programs, proper equipment is needed to teach and train the attendees.

Small Animals

HARRISON MEMORIAL ANIMAL HOSPITAL
PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Carol Breslin

OVERVIEW: This proposal seeks to improve animal dentistry in the Denver in three ways:

  1. To expand dental services at the largest non-profit animal hospital in Colorado
  2. To provide educational opportunities in veterinary dentistry to fourth year veterinary students from across the country
  3. To allow for further educational opportunities for the applicant of this proposal
  4. If the aims of this proposal are met, the groundwork would be laid for these educational opportunities and for increasing dental services at Harrison Memorial Animal Hospital, all of which would result in better oral health in companion animals in the Denver area.

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